Breast Cancer Screening Policies Questioned Again

Researchers conducting a large national registry study recommended changes to current breast cancer screening guidelines that would make family history a more important consideration in setting ages to begin regular mammography.

Elham Kharazmi, MD, PhD, of the National Center for Tumor Diseases in Heidelberg, Germany, and colleagues looked at data from large Swedish data sets on 5,099,172 women born there from 1932 onward with at least one known first-degree relative. Of these women in the latest dataset from 2017, 2.3% were diagnosed with primary invasive breast cancer, the majority of whom (86.4%) had no family history of the disease.

As described in the team’s nationwide cohort study online in JAMA Oncology, the risk-adapted starting age of screening was defined as the age by which women with a family history of breast cancer attained a 10-year cumulative risk that was similar to the average risk for women at the recommended age of screening initiation in the general population

https://cercatalent.com/2019/breast-cancer-screening-policies-questioned-again/